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2008 Annual Report Page 31

Comprehensive income (loss)

Comprehensive income (loss) is defined as the change in equity (net assets) of a business enterprise during the period from transactions and other events and circumstances from non-owner sources. Comprehensive income (loss) consists of net income (loss), additional minimum pension liability adjustments and unrealized gains and losses on equity securities.

Recently issued accounting pronouncements and regulations

In December 2007, the FASB issued guidance establishing principles and requirements for how an acquirer in a business combination: 1) recognizes and measures in its financial statements identifiable assets acquired, liabilities assumed, and any noncontrolling interest in the acquiree; 2) recognizes and measures goodwill acquired in a business combination or a gain from a bargain purchase; and 3) determines what information to disclose to enable users of the financial statements to evaluate the nature and financial effects of a business combination. This guidance is effective for business combinations for which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning on or after December 15, 2008. Therefore, we expect to adopt this guidance for any business combinations entered into beginning in fiscal 2010, if any.

In December 2008, the FASB issued additional guidance on an employers' disclosures about plan assets of a defined benefit pension or other postretirement plan. This interpretation is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years ending after December 15, 2009. We plan to adopt this interpretation in fiscal 2010. The adoption of this interpretation will increase the disclosures in the financial statements related to the assets of our defined benefit pension plans.

In April 2009, the FASB issued guidance about disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments, to require disclosure of the carrying amount and the fair value of all financial instruments for interim reporting periods and annual financial statements of publicly traded companies (even if the financial instrument is not recognized in the balance sheet), including the methods and significant assumptions used to estimate the fair values and any changes in such methods and assumptions.  This guidance requires disclosures in summarized financial information at interim reporting periods.  The guidance is effective for interim reporting periods ending after June 15, 2009, with early adoption permitted for periods ended after March 15, 2009.  The adoption of this standard did not have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

In April 2009, the FASB also issued guidance which generally applies to all assets and liabilities within the scope of any accounting pronouncements that require or permit fair value measurements.  This guidance does not change previously issued guidance regarding Level 1 inputs, requires the entity to (i) evaluate certain factors to determine whether there has been a significant decrease in the volume and level of activity for the asset or liability when compared with normal market activity, (ii) consider whether the preceding indicates that transactions or quoted prices are not determinative of fair value and, if so, whether a significant adjustment thereof is necessary to estimate fair value, and (iii) ignore the intent to hold the asset or liability when estimating fair value.  Guidance was also provided to consider in determining whether a transaction is orderly (or not orderly) when there has been a significant decrease in the volume and level of activity for the asset or liability, based on the weight of available evidence.  This guidance is effective for interim and annual reporting periods ending after June 15, 2009, and shall be applied prospectively.  The adoption of this standard did not have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.
  
 
In June 2009, the FASB issued SFAS guidance on “The FASB Accounting Standards Codification and the Hierarchy of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.” This guidance designates the FASB Accounting Standards Codification, officially launched July 1, 2009, as the authoritative source of generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. Rules and interpretive releases of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) under federal securities laws are also sources of authoritative GAAP for SEC registrants. This guidance is effective for financial statements issued for interim and annual periods ending after September 15, 2009. Adoption of this guidance did not have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 
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